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arelyn
08-30-2018, 12:47 AM
Now that my oldest is in middle school it seems like I need to figure out how to get my ducks in a row rather than waiting for high school (especially since he may end up college ready early). Everything Iíve seen so far has been rather overwhelming. Are there any simple step by step resources out there? How do you turn laid back child led learning into a transcript? Do I really need to give him grades and how? All ideas and resources welcome!

gabriola
08-30-2018, 05:16 AM
I am in the same position, I don't have any advice but would love to know how others have transitioned successfully in this area.

Ms_Dahl
08-30-2018, 05:16 AM
I'll join in this conversation. I am navigating the middle school to high school transition as well. There are a few paid resources available online that track it for you, but I would like to do this without paying for it.

I'll add more thoughts later.

The Tickle Momster
08-30-2018, 09:27 AM
I use a couple of resources.

My Homeschool Grades for transcript and keeping track of credit.

This link for unschooling type transcripts (https://unschoolrules.com/unschooling-high-school-transcript/). It's really helpful even if you don't unschool. It's really good!

I like Lee Binz, The Home Scholar. (https://www.homehighschoolhelp.com) She has lots of free resources on her site and some paid stuff too. The free stuff is really helpful.

Katigre
08-30-2018, 10:02 AM
Have you thought about reverse brainstorming - what are the essential learning skills, content knowledge, and educational experiences that make up a well rounded high school education? One you have your end goals in mind, then you can chart a path to getting there.

I think this also differs based on post secondary plans and the child's particular bent. Community colleges offer remedial classes in math and writing, but they're generally for students who haven't achieved high school graduate proficiency. [These are different than the majority of community college classes that count for college credit]

---------- Post added at 12:02 PM ---------- Previous post was at 12:01 PM ----------

I do think planning in middle school makes sense. So much of high school builds on itself, like math and science sequences.

charla
08-30-2018, 11:48 AM
A resource that I had thought I might use was Senior High: A Home-Designed Form+u+la by Barbara Shelton. It talks about how to set up a transcript and it has lots of good ideas for making interests, life situations, and classes into high school credit and how to track and grade those courses.

arelyn
08-30-2018, 12:12 PM
I use a couple of resources.

My Homeschool Grades for transcript and keeping track of credit.

This link for unschooling type transcripts (https://unschoolrules.com/unschooling-high-school-transcript/). It's really helpful even if you don't unschool. It's really good!

I like Lee Binz, The Home Scholar. (https://www.homehighschoolhelp.com) She has lots of free resources on her site and some paid stuff too. The free stuff is really helpful.

That first link is just amazing! It's a big relief. Though I do wonder if a no grades transcript would be looked favorably upon by a more competitive university.

The Tickle Momster
08-30-2018, 12:56 PM
That first link is just amazing! It's a big relief. Though I do wonder if a no grades transcript would be looked favorably upon by a more competitive university.
Yeah. I would contact any university you are applying to and talk to the admissions counselor. Someone here gave grades after the fact and did it based on how well the student remembered the material. :shrug Grades really are arbitrary for homeschoolers.

mamacat
08-30-2018, 02:51 PM
When the time comes agree about contacting any college or trade school about what they may want. I carefully kept a transcript and found out our local college doesnt even want or require them. Just usual entry tests. No transcript needed until high school age tho. Google the info for your state because each is different as far as requirements and number of credits and which subjects. I am a master at making a transcript out of out of the box kind of things. You can use work study or more experiental type things as electibe credits. I pulled up the course code list for our state and was able to match up course titles and codes for various subjects that way. Especially ones I pieced together. People seem to go to great lengths to try and list curriculum used and that sort of thing. Unless it is required I would not.

HuggaBuggaMommy
08-30-2018, 03:00 PM
Another thought, and this is the route ds1 went (and actually me, when I was a kid, though it was a different situation) is that 24 college credits makes you a transfer student and not a freshman applicant to most colleges; therefore there is no need for high school transcripts and usually no need for standardized test scores (SATs or ACTs). Ds1 went to community college and will transfer to the school of his choice with more than 24 credits at this point. He is also getting his GED that way.

So, it's a bit round about and a little unconventional, but much less for me - and him - to worry about regarding high school work.

mamacat
08-30-2018, 03:17 PM
You can assign grades in high school if you are concerned. Based on a far superior system than just rounding out test scores. When you homeschool you have a much better idea of exactly how your child is doing with a given subject and you can include that knowledge when you assign a grade . That is a great resource arelyn listed if you are looking to make an unschooly/eclectic diploma!

Soliloquy
08-30-2018, 07:38 PM
My eldest will do dual enrollment at the community college while in high school. If she completes enough credit, she'll be a transfer student, not applying as a freshman, like a PP wrote. If she doesn't earn that many credits, then I will have her write a transcript based on what she's learned at home and through dual enrollment. I will also encourage her to take CLEP tests, if she discovers that she tests well, like I did.

I don't plan to write transcripts for any of my kids. Help them, yes, but not write them.

The colleges I've pre-selected for her (just as ideas, of course she's free to go wherever she wants) have info on applying as a homeschooler.

Here's an example: https://college.lclark.edu/offices/admissions/apply/policies/homeschool/

Maleldil's daughter
09-02-2018, 05:10 AM
My dh was homeschooled and did dual enrollment at a community college as well. He was only able to take a limited number of classes without a high school diploma so at some point his dad did have to make a transcript.
I went to public school, then community college as a freshman. Then we both transferred to Biola University. Dh was able to enter as a transfer student and didn't need his high school transcript. However, he spent an entire year longer at Biola than I did even though he had taken a comparable amount of credits in community college, because he hadn't received good guidance about the kind of classes that would transfer or be important for a four year degree.
All that to say, I think dual credit is great, but if the plan is to transfer, plan ahead.

tempus vernum
09-04-2018, 01:57 PM
We’ve had zero trouble. I did my own transcripts as I consider them “report cards” to be done by the teacher. we also used them for our car insurances “good student discount.”

We look at technical college and several universities, then we double check that’s more than required by state and go from there. I got a template from
A homeschooler whose kidsgradusted before mine and used that.

As far as getting into college, we do this based on the child’s abilities/desires!!
Kid 1 took her act’s and because they were decent had no trouble at any place she applied. She started technical college for a healthcare career last week ;)

Kids 2 will probably do an internship or community college after high school so we r making sure he’s ready for this. He hates shook and does not want to do college.

Kid 3 will probably dual enroll but we will do this through a university that offers special prices for HSers so she will have to take act’s very young (freshman or sophomore year) in order to qualify for their program - it’s $30/credit and she’s capable or we wouldn’t be going this route. She also wants to be a phys therapist which requires a doctorate so I’m happy she could get a head start on college . She’s starting act prep next year (9th grade).