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View Full Version : Why does my tooth hurt with sweets?


ChristianMother27
08-30-2006, 10:23 AM
Ok backstory - I've only ever had one cavity in my life. it was on a molar on my left side of my mouth, upper side. the dentist said it was probably because of some medication i'd taken when that molar was coming in (i think it's like the 12 year old molar but not sure. it's not the last molar, it's the one next to it, and i don't have wisdom teeth)

anyways, my filling was really deep and my dentist was kind of worried about the structure of my tooth - i think it had cracked and i got an infection in it and was going to need a root canal but i skipped that. anyways they refilled the tooth, but the dentist was still concerned about it. so we decided to get a crown. i got a crown just fine and have had no problem for months. but just like a week ago i was chewing some soft gummy candy, and i happened to chew a little on that tooth and it HURT SO BAD! i used my fingernail and tongue to get the gummy off my tooth and when it was gone it was fine. it was like a throbbing pain while it was there. toothpaste doesn't hurt the tooth... cold water doesn't hurt it, hot is fine, salty is fine... i was chewing some salty chips on that side just fine... chili, no problem... JUST sweet stuff... i tried to look stuff up online and none of the stuff i found really sounded applicable. the closest thing i found was that maybe it was some exposed dentin from the enamel wearing down or something, but i don't get how that could happen on a crown that is less than a year old... :shrug it's the ONLY tooth i have this pain on. i just don't get it. and FTR i rarely even chew on that side so i don't understand how it could be worn down. when i had my original tooth i noticed when the enamel wore down because it chipped a little in my mouth and i realized it was enamel... but this one hasn't chipped as far as i can tell... so i just don't get it. any ideas?

KitKat
08-30-2006, 10:42 AM
Well, I don't have any crowns. But, I have a couple teeth that hurt like that with sweets and the dentist said it was the start of a cavity. Just the enamel being soft. Maybe your enamel under the crown or near your gums or something is soft. He just gave me a flouride to put on my teeth to fix it and it works well.

tiglet
08-30-2006, 10:43 AM
Yep, what KitKat wrote.
Brush good, use fluoride, and remember your flossing. If you're diligent enough, and it's small enough, you can avoid a filling. Or perhaps not - but it's worth a try.

ChristianMother27
08-30-2006, 10:45 AM
that's so strange though, can the enamel on a crown wear down that quickly? i've barely had this thing more than a few months. definitely i'll be brushing and flossing better now though.

Punkie
08-30-2006, 10:50 AM
My dentist told me that it can also be caused by using too hard of a toothbrush, using a whitener, or using too harsh of a toothpaste. All of those things can wear down enamel. I switched to a soft toothbrush and cut out my whitestrips and my problem went away :) I noticed that there is a warning on the teeth whiteners that they can cause it.

ChristianMother27
08-30-2006, 10:58 AM
i did a little research on the crown cavity thing and now i am even more perpelexed. it said that while a crown will never get a cavity, you could get one at the edge of the crown, which makes sense, but my sensitivity is on the grinding part of the molar and that is all crown there... my crown is like a little hat over my tooth. if i had sensitivity around my gumline that would make sense to me about a cavity but it's in the little depression part of the molar that i have the pain. :scratch so confused now.



My dentist told me that it can also be caused by using too hard of a toothbrush, using a whitener, or using too harsh of a toothpaste. All of those things can wear down enamel. I switched to a soft toothbrush and cut out my whitestrips and my problem went away :) I noticed that there is a warning on the teeth whiteners that they can cause it.


hmm i think my toothbrush is medium (it could be soft, but definitely not hard). my toothpaste is colgate. i can't remember what flavor of colgate, didn't think it was whitening but i can check. if it was a whitening toothpaste would it make sense that it was just this one tooth that was getting worn down and not any of the others?

This Busy Mom
08-30-2006, 11:29 AM
I have a tooth that bothered me for years and have been to the dentist several times because of it and they never found anything wrong with it. It's now turning brown at the gumline (it's a wisdom tooth).

ChristianMother27
08-30-2006, 11:38 AM
weird. i just don't get it. it doesn't hurt except if i put something sweet there. when i had the filling it used to be sensitive to hot cold but now it's not :shrug bizarre.

Punkie
08-30-2006, 11:43 AM
Maybe this will have some ideas for you:
http://www.dentalgentlecare.com/sensitivity.htm

ChristianMother27
08-30-2006, 01:42 PM
maybe i'll try a sensitivity toothpaste. it's just so weird that this just started after several months of a crown that was just fine. oh well i dunno - maybe it's a hypersensitivity thing... i am 26 now lol

tiglet
08-31-2006, 03:54 PM
Weird. I know I have a composite filling in my mouth that makes my gum hurt (it's right next to my gum) when I eat sweet or cold things, but that is because my body is sensitive to something in the composite (that's what they say - so, no more composite fillings for me, but apparently this one isn't worth taking out to do an amalgam one for.)

Wonder if you're reacting to some material in the crown, perhaps?

inesperada
08-31-2006, 09:09 PM
I was having sweet sensitivity a year ago, and the dentist told me that it was most likely a tiny fracture in the tooth. He said that those often cause sweet sensitivity but nothing else. He also said it was quite possible that it was due to the pressure the tooth was under (nearby teeth were pushing it).

ChristianMother27
09-01-2006, 06:26 AM
I was having sweet sensitivity a year ago, and the dentist told me that it was most likely a tiny fracture in the tooth. He said that those often cause sweet sensitivity but nothing else. He also said it was quite possible that it was due to the pressure the tooth was under (nearby teeth were pushing it).


:think hmm that could be possible. is it something needs immediate dental attention or can it be put off? (bad question i know lol but it's kind of a bad time to be shelling out money right now if it can be delayed :giggle)